Cold Fury

Harshing your mellow since 9/01

The Democrats haven’t been this pissed off since Republicans made them give up their slaves

Let’s ban all the things! And I do mean ALL if them. Starting here:

As an African-American, Sharpton believes that using federal tax dollars to subsidize the Jefferson Memorial is wrong. And even though the flames of Cultural Revolution are burning hot, you can understand this.

History is important, but history can also be quite offensive.

But there’s one thing wrong with Sharpton. It’s not that he goes too far. It’s that he doesn’t go far enough.

Because if he and others of the Cultural Revolution were being intellectually honest, they’d demand that along with racist statues, something else would be toppled.

And this, too, represents much of America’s racist history:

The Democratic Party.

The Democratic Party historically is the party of slavery. The Democratic Party is the party of Jim Crow laws. The Democratic Party fought civil rights for a century.

And so by rights — or at least by the standards established by the Cultural Revolutionaries of today’s American left — we should ban the Democratic Party.

Not only get rid of it in the present, but strike its very name from the history books, and topple all Democratic statues of leaders who benefited, prospered and became wealthy by cleaving to the party. And shame Democrats until they confess the truth of it.

the new Cultural Revolution was serious, wouldn’t it also demand that the Democratic Party be put in a museum somewhere, away from decent people, along with those Confederate statues?

We could put Democrats in exhibits, behind glass, watching white political bosses chomp cigars and pass out goodies for votes, as minorities were relegated, as they are today, to failing schools and lost educational opportunity and neighborhoods that have become killing fields for the young and old.

And in great museums, the Democrats could be studied, safely, without endangering the sensibilities of the children.

Of course, the Democrat-Socialists, being fucking lunatics to a man/woman/amorphous non-gendered blob/thing, are well on their way to rendering themselves electorally extinct anyway. But why shouldn’t decent Americans express their disgust with the Party of Slavery by making it legal and official through a legislative ban?

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Update

Okay, so the move is pretty much all done; nothing left but unpacking my packrat’s hoard of useless crap and doing a little repair, renovation, and cleanup work at the old pad. Back to whatever normal is around here real soon now; heck, the weekend might even see a post or three, ya never know.

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In search of Spock

I was kind of at sea when it came to mentioning the death of Leonard Nimoy, having nothing much to say that everybody else hadn’t already said. So I just held off on it and said nothing. I’m glad now that I waited.

“I loved Spock,” said President Obama, reacting to the death of actor Leonard Nimoy. Why? Because Spock reminds him of himself. The galaxy’s most famous Vulcan, the president wrote, was “Cool, logical, big-eared, and level headed, the center of Star Trek’s optimistic, inclusive vision of humanity’s future.” Just like you know whom.

The president is not the only writer who has drawn comparisons between himself and Spock. I am also a Star Trek fan, but I admit I was somewhat confused by my rather apathetic reaction to Nimoy’s death. And as I thought more about the president’s statement, I realized he identifies with the very aspects of the Spock character that most annoy me. I don’t love Spock at all.

The 2009 movie has a backstory that is complicated and silly, and I am too tired to recount it in detail so you can read a synopsis here. Nevertheless, Star Trek is an enjoyable picture that is revealing of Spock’s awfulness. It shows how Spock (played by Zachary Quinto) is tormented, physically and mentally, by the fact that his mother is human, how Mr. Logic is actually a boiling kettle of fury, resentment, passion, and ambition. Spock is a jerk to his girlfriend Uhura (Zoe Saldana), who is way out of his league. He almost kills Kirk (Chris Pine). He is so overcome with emotion he relieves himself from duty in the middle of a huge crisis.

Spock is rude to his father. “I never knew what Spock was doing,” Sarek (Mark Lenard) tells Picard in “Unification 1.” “When he was a boy, he would disappear for days into the mountains. I would ask him where he had gone, what he had done; he’d refuse to tell me. I forbade him to go; he ignored me.” Spock and Sarek fight constantly throughout the Trek continuity, despite Sarek’s offering his son countless diplomatic opportunities that Spock invariably messes up. Then Spock ignores his father for years as Sarek suffers from Bendai Syndrome and dies.

And Obama likes this selfish jerk?

Well, he would, wouldn’t he? Continetti runs through a lot more of this sort of thing, all of it in good fun, winding it up thusly:

It’s in this scene where Data’s superiority to Spock is most apparent. Data not only has the mental and physical edge over practically everyone, he is curious and earnest and humane, while Spock is moody, flip, detached, and self-consciously superior. Data wants to fit in, while Spock displaces his anxieties over his bicultural heritage onto his family and work relationships. Data’s words and actions are the result of blind unerring computation, while Spock is a creature of inner conflict and envies his famous and high achieving father. I’d pick Data over Spock for my first officer any day.

What Leonard Nimoy’s death revealed is that there is a sizable portion of Trek fans, and of nerds in general, that identifies with Spock’s neuroses, his hang-ups, his self-loathing, that are attracted to the cold soulless abstractions through which he views life, who believe in the naïve and ineffective diplomacy in which he so thoughtlessly and recklessly and harmfully engages. I can’t help but find this revelation disturbing. One of those fans happens to be the president of the United States who, like Spock, has derided the notion of helping to end the slaughter of the Syrian Civil War as illogical while giving up leverage in his negotiations with Iran. It will take America some time to recover from the legacy of our Spock-loving president—though probably not as long as it will take my friends to stop laughing at me for writing this column.

Heh. Like I said: good fun, and none of it necessarily derogatory of an excellent actor’s skilled portrayal of a memorable but highly flawed character, although it may well be interpreted that way.

Oh, and Nimoy was great as Spock too. May he rest in peace.

Update! Okay, i just gotta say it: I like Spock and all, and Leonard Nimoy seems to have been a fine fellow. But when all’s said and done, I’ll take Bill Murray:

Step five: Leave yourself open to magical moments. It’s unclear how long ago this was, but Murray told a tale of being in a cab in Oakland and finding out his cab driver was a saxophone player. The driver, however, never got to practice because he drove 14 hours a day. So when Murray also found out the guy’s sax was in the trunk, he had him pull over, get out his horn, sit in the back, and play while Murray drove. “You know, that’s like two and two. It makes four,” Murray said. “Not only did he play all the way to Sausalito, which is a long ways, but we stopped and got barbecue. He was playing at what people would call a sketchy rib place in Oakland at like 2:15 in the morning. It’s like, ‘Relax, man. You’ve got the fucking horn. We’re cool here.’ He’s blowing the horn and the crowd’s like, ‘What the hell’s that crazy white dude playing that thing?’ And it was great. It made for a beautiful night. I think we’d all do that, if you saw that moment and you’re, as we say, available, you’d make the connection and you’d do it right.”

Step six: Stay relaxed and success will follow. “Someone told me some secrets early on about living. You have to remind yourself that you can do the very best you can when you’re very, very relaxed. No matter what it is, no matter what your job is, the more relaxed you are, the better you are. That’s sort of why I got into acting. I realized that the more fun I had, the better I did it, and I thought, Well, that’s a job I can be proud of. I’d be proud to have that job, if I had to go to work and say, ‘No matter what my condition or what my mood is, no matter how I feel about what’s going on in my life, if I can relax myself and enjoy what I’m doing and have fun with it, then I can do my job really well.’ And it’s changed my life, learning that. And it’s made me better at what I do. I’m not the greatest or anything. But I really enjoy what I do.”

I mean, come on; how can you not just love the guy? I’d wager he’s more fun to hang out with than any ten other Hollywood celebs you could name, from any era you can think of. Time spent with Murray would just about have to be time well spent by definition, no matter what you were doing. A positive, hopeful attitude like his is infectious, and it damned well ought to be, too.

Years ago I wrote a piece about New Orleans, and that’s what reading about Murray’s…well, adventures is probably the best word, I guess–always reminds me of. I’ve spent a goodly portion of my life chasing after that kind of spontaneous serendipity myself, and while it ain’t exactly been enriching in the monetary sense, I sure have had a lot of fun at it.

(Via Insty)

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Obama: Red China “superior to us”

You really can’t make this stuff up:

Everybody’s watching what’s going on in Beijing right now with the Olympics. Think about the amount of money that China has spent on infrastructure. Their ports, their train systems, their airports are vastly the superior to us now, which means if you are a corporation deciding where to do business you’re starting to think, “Beijing looks like a pretty good option.

Yeah, right. Just never mind about that whole state-run economy thing, and the tossing of dissidents into labor camps thing, and the unbreathable air thing, and the internet-censorship thing, and the whole communist-opression thing generally.

Well, not that the Collectivist Messiah, or most other Social Dems for that matter, would have a problem with any of that, mind. I mean, seeing as how they’ve done their utmost to head us in the same direction for years anyway.

Fucking gullible, greenhorn idiot. Bought any bridges in Beijing lately, you dolt?

Know what I like about Obama, though? As with his close friend, unashamed terrorist would-be murderer Bill Ayers, it’s all right out in the open with him. You always know exactly where he’s coming from: the far, far Left.

Just don’t ever “smear” him as a communist, okay? They just hate it when you tell the truth about ’em. They start flopping around on the floor and rolling their eyes back in their heads and frothing at the mouth when you do that.

It’s actually kind of hilarious to see.

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