A change of heart

I’ve thought it over a good bit, influenced by the leanings in the “let it all burn” direction of our esteemed regulars Barry and Ironbear, and I no longer think Trump should lift a finger to save Democrat-Socialist-run cities from reaping the fruits of their own stubborn folly.

But I’m gonna go even further to express my specific and unalloyed support for tearing down every last remaining statue of the Founders of this ruined nation as well—not because I despise them and all their works, but because We The Sheepul are no longer worthy of them. Every American should hang his head in abject shame at the sight of any reminder of these brilliant, courageous men, because of the way we’ve disgraced their noble legacy. Erase all memory of them, their proud history and achievements, their lofty ideals, their blueprint for proper governance. We failed utterly to live up to any of it, and can only further embarrass ourselves by pretending to be deserving of the incalculable benefits those ideals and institutions yielded up, gifts we purblind ingrates took for granted for so long.

Via WRSA, Fred Reed expounds at some length on more reasons to throw up our hands and just enjoy watching the collapse.

What fun, what entertainment. And rare: One seldom sees the collapse of a landmark society in a rush of wondrous idiocy. Would I could sell tickets. Don’t look at it as a loss, but as a show, an unwanted but grand amusement.

The coup de grace in our ripening decadence is the current uprising purportedly, though implausibly, over racism. But never mind. The causes don’t matter. The deal is done.

Still, it is interesting to recognize that the protesters are, perhaps deliberately, confusing the incapacity of blacks with systemic racism. In truth, America has made the greatest effort ever essayed by one race to uplift another. Reflect: In 1954 an entirely white Supreme Court unanimously ended segregation. Later it found the use of IQ tests by employers illegal because blacks scored poorly, then found “affirmative action,” racial discrimination against whites, legal (hardly oppression of blacks, this). An overwhelmingly white Congress passed the Civil Rights Act in 1964, the Voting Rights Act the next year. A white President sent troops to Little Rock to enforce desegregation. There has been an enormous flow of charity to blacks: Section Eight Housing, AFDC, Head Start, hiring quotas, set-asides, sharply lowered standards in police and fire departments. We now have free breakfasts for black children, then free lunches, in addition to outright welfare. In aggregate they resemble a distributed guaranteed basic income. Which is interesting.

These measures sprang from the best of intentions. Most I think should continue. I for one do not want to evict blacks from public housing or have their children go hungry. Yet none of these programs has had its desired effect. The crucial academic gap has not closed, crime remains horribly high, illegitimacy verges on universal. This is a great shame. Blacks are decent enough people, likable if they don’t hate you, and phenomenally talented. But it hasn’t worked.

Nothing has worked. There is no indication that anything will. The great black cities are in something approaching custodial care.

Many cities are routinely out of control, with seven hundred homicides in Chicago and three hundred in Baltimore every year. Increasingly criminals are released without bail and small crimes, such as evading subway fares, are ignored when committed by minorities. The hordes of derelicts grow, the New York subways become a homeless shelter. These are not problems seen in civilized countries. Which America no longer is, to the astonishment and amusement of the world.

Perhaps this was to be expected. The American practice of choosing its leaders every two, four, or six years by popularity contest worked, after a fashion anyway, in a sprawling continental country in which government had very little local influence. In a world far more complex, with little ability to plan when those in charge change with paralyzing rapidity, and everything intensely regulated by people unfamiliar with problems, results are poor. America’s competition with large countries having intelligently authoritarian and stable governance will prove a losing proposition proposition. The inevitable decline in standard of living, already well underwater, will promote unrest. Here we go again.

We have done what Marx couldn’t: Achieved communism, a true dictatorship of the proletariat, of a rabble jacquerie of much noise and no wit, the rule of the unfit. It is a rule only of the culture. The moneyed would not grant it power over anything else. Yet rule it is. We shall hear much of the authenticity of the illiterate, the purity of ghetto urges, the wisdom of the people, the need to lay low the pretensions of the mansion.

As a philosophic emollient one may reflect that all empires and civilizations must end, and ours is. America will remain as a place, a military bastion, a large if declining economic force. It will never again be, even by the low standards of humanity in such things, a relatively free and vigorous society. The world will not again credit its charades of moral leadership. The rot, the tens of thousands of derelict people living on the sidewalks, the looting and fire setting, the censorship, are now visible to the entire earth. Oh well. It was a good thing while it lasted.

Amusingly enough, after Fred’s article there’s an ad for his book with an Amazon blurb that also serves as a listing of the freedom we threw away:

Essays on America, life, politics, and just about everything. The author chronicles among other adventures an aging stripper in Austin, dressed in a paper-mache horse, who had with her a cobra and a tarantula like a yak-hair pillow with legs and alternately charmed and terrified a room full of cowboys sucking down Bud and…. Fred was an apostle of the long-haul thumb during the Sixties and saw…many things. He tells of standing by the big roads across the desert, rockin in the wind blast of the heavy rigs roaring by and the whine of tires and dropping into an arroyo at night with a bottle of cheap red and watching the stars and perhaps smoking things not approved by the government. He tells of..well, that’s what the book is for. Join him.

Sounds kinda crazy, kinda wild, and completely wonderful, don’t it? Hard to imagine today’s milquetoast, man-bunned Millenials having any such adventures, or even wanting to. And it’s a dead cert that in the extremely unlikely event that Pajama Boy ever attempted such frolicsome hijinks, The Power would put a stop to the idea most ricky-tick. Good ol’ George sure did have the right of it all along, didn’t he?




“Talking about, and being it, that’s two different things.” Fucking ouch. The wisdom and clarity expressed in the above clip still gives me goosebumps, even after having seen it about a thousand and one times over the years.

7 thoughts on “A change of heart

  1. “These measures sprang from the best of intentions. Most I think should continue. I for one do not want to evict blacks from public housing or have their children go hungry.”

    Some had good intentions, sure. But the politicians? No, hell no. They knew exactly what they were doing.

    The welfare state is responsible for every bit of trouble we have. Every damn bit. Bring jobs back to the USA and end the welfare. Don’t want to work, fine, starve. You and your kids.

    Keep the short term assistance. People can and do benefit from this and I believe society does as well.

    Get a job.

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  2. *blink* OMG. I actually influenced someone’s views on a topic? I feel… flushed with power now! Mwahahahahaha! 🙂

  3. “Evil, demonic, attack squirrel of death, with a patrol car.”

    OK, that made me laugh, loudly. I think I know that squirrels evil twin…

  4. On The Road by Jack Kerouac.
    America 1949, a place I only had glimpses of in my youth.
    With the Chinese Flu Clampdown you can’t even see a live band, let alone the smoky jazz clubs packed with people that was written about by Jack when he and Cassady crossed the country back and forth, at high speed.

    You can’t even smoke in a bar any more. Well, when they were allowed to be open.

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