Cold Fury

Harshing your mellow since 9/01

Epic!

Still the best July 4th story of all time.

On this day in 1826, 50 years after the Declaration of Independence was adopted in Philadelphia, John Adams died at home in Braintree. One of the great men of the Revolutionary generation and the second president of the United States, Adams was 91 years old. Shortly before he breathed his last, John Adams whispered, “Thomas Jefferson survives.”

But he was wrong.

In fact, 560 miles away at Monticello, Thomas Jefferson had died only a few hours earlier. The fact that these two founding fathers died on the same day and that it was, of all days, the Fourth of July was not viewed as a coincidence. In his two-hour eulogy at Fanueil Hall, Daniel Webster cited it as “proof” of how much God cared for the country.

Of course, there’s more to the Jefferson/Adams saga than just that.

Thomas Jefferson and John Adams were the last surviving members of the original American revolutionaries who had stood up to the British empire and forged a new political system in the former colonies. However, while they both believed in democracy and life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, their opinions on how to achieve these ideals diverged over time.

Adams preceded Jefferson as president (1797-1800); it was during this time that their ideas about policy-making became as distinct as their personalities. The irascible and hot-tempered Adams was a firm believer in a strong centralized government, while the erudite and gentile Jefferson believed federal government should take a more hands-off approach and defer to individual states’ rights. As Adams’ vice president, Jefferson was so horrified by what he considered to be Adams’ abuse of the presidency–particularly his passage of the restrictive Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798–that he abandoned Adams and Washington for his estate at Monticello. There, he plotted how to bring his Republican faction back into power in the presidential election of 1800. After an exceptionally bitter campaign, in which both parties engaged in slanderous attacks on each other in print, Jefferson emerged victorious. It appeared the former friends would be eternal enemies.

After serving two presidential terms (1801-1809), Jefferson and Adams each expressed to third parties their respect the other and their desire to renew their friendship. Adams was the first to break the silence; he sent Jefferson a letter dated January 1, 1812, in which he wished Jefferson many happy new years to come. Jefferson responded with a note in which he fondly recalled when they were fellow laborers in the same cause. The former revolutionaries went on to resume their friendship over 14 years of correspondence during their golden years.

If you have any interest in history and haven’t read David McCullough’s John Adams yet, you really ought to. It’s a good ‘un.

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2 thoughts on “Epic!

  1. mike, i would add to the suggested reading “Founding Brothers” by Joseph Ellis, which dedicates a substantial portion of the text to the conversation and ultimately resolution between Adams and Jefferson. Beginning of my red pill.

  2. Adams “irascible and hot-tempered?” So, you’re saying he was the original MASShole, eh?

    For another good read about the Second English Civil War (American Revolution), read “1775” by Kevin Phillips.

    Learned more from reading that, than I did from an entire college course on the Revolution (or Civil War, if you please, particularly in the Southern and the Middle Atlantic colonies, as well as western CT, where the strong Loyalist contingent was kept under control by roving bands of aggressive, well-armed “patriots”. Washinton Irving’s “The Spy” captures the uncivil nature of this rebellion on Long Island: where the western part was under CT influenceand patriot; while the eastern part closer to NYC, was heavily Loyalist.)

    Also learned that the Russians and Spanish, were truer friends of the Patriot cause than the ever-duplicitous French; although all three countries had their own bone to pick with the British Empire and viewed assisting the the Rebellion as a way to get back at The Evil Empire.!

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"America is at that awkward stage. It's too late to work within the system, but too early to shoot the bastards." – Claire Wolfe, 101 Things to Do 'Til the Revolution

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