Cold Fury

Harshing your mellow since 9/01

A little history

I just love stories like this.

Seems like cars have always had radios, but they didn’t. Here’s the story:
 
One evening, in 1929, two young men named William Lear and Elmer Wavering drove their girlfriends to a lookout point high above the Mississippi River town of Quincy, Illinois, to watch the sunset. It was a romantic night to be sure, but one of the women observed that it would be even nicer if they could listen to music in the car.

Lear and Wavering liked the idea. Both men had tinkered with radios (Lear served as a radio operator in the U.S. Navy during World War I) and it wasn’t long before they were taking apart a home radio and trying to get it to work in a car. But it wasn’t easy: automobiles have ignition switches, generators, spark plugs, and other electrical equipment that generate noisy static interference, making it nearly impossible to listen to the radio when the engine was running.

One by one, Lear and Wavering identified and eliminated each source of electrical interference. When they finally got their radio to work, they took it to a radio convention in Chicago. There they met Paul Galvin, owner of Galvin Manufacturing Corporation. He made a product called a “battery eliminator”, a device that allowed battery-powered radios to run on household AC current. But as more homes were wired for electricity, more radio manufacturers made AC-powered radios. Galvin needed a new product to manufacture. When he met Lear and Wavering at the radio convention, he found it.

He believed that mass-produced, affordable car radios had the potential to become a huge business. Lear and Wavering set up shop in Galvin’s factory, and when they perfected their first radio, they installed it in his Studebaker. Then Galvin went to a local banker to apply for a loan. Thinking it might sweeten the deal, he had his men install a radio in the banker’s Packard. Good idea, but it didn’t work – Half an hour after the installation, the banker’s Packard caught on fire. (They didn’t get the loan.) 

Galvin and company kept after it, and the rest is a story as richly American as apple pie: a tale of the kind of unfettered risk-taking, inspired apparent lunacy, drive, and entrepreneurial creativity that built a great nation–the mouldering corpse of which Leftist parasites are now greedily feeding on to finance the expansion of their precious neo-Marxist tyranny, which will stifle such creativity forevermore. Or, y’know, until it’s violently overthrown and capitalist freedom reigns once more.

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2 thoughts on “A little history

  1. Yep. It’s pretty much the story of how Motorola came to be. And Lear invented not just eight-track tapes, but a whole bunch of other things, including…well, you’ll just have to read the rest of it for all that–or think real hard about it. Think “aviation” and that oughta get you there. 😉

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